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Do you use Siltex?



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 2nd 14, 09:24 PM posted to rec.ponds
Ann-Marie L
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Do you use Siltex?


Hi, I'm Ann and I live in the English midlands. For years beyond
measure I've kept fish, been a devoted gardener and pondkeeper and of
recent years I managed a company that desilts lakes and restores aquatic
environments, including river bank repairs after flooding.

What we have only just realised is that domestic pondkeepers don't seem
to use a product that we use twice a year on the large lakes and village
ponds that we help to care for. That's Siltex. We use it to help break
down existing organic silt (the stinky black gunge) and to prevent new
deposits from become blacky and stinky.

Normally we sell it by the tonne; we've just realised that we maybe
should sell it by the kilo... which treats a 4x4m pond.

What do you think? Shall I put the technical info up as part of the
thread?




--
Ann-Marie L
  #2  
Old May 4th 14, 04:08 PM posted to rec.ponds
a425couple
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Do you use Siltex?

"Ann-Marie L" wrote.co.uk...
Hi, I'm Ann and I live in the English midlands. For years beyond
measure I've kept fish, been a devoted gardener and pondkeeper and of
recent years I managed a company that desilts lakes and restores aquatic
environments, including river bank repairs after flooding.

What we have only just realised is that domestic pondkeepers don't seem
to use a product that we use twice a year on the large lakes and village
ponds that we help to care for. That's Siltex. We use it to help break
down existing organic silt (the stinky black gunge) and to prevent new
deposits from become blacky and stinky.

Normally we sell it by the tonne; we've just realised that we maybe
should sell it by the kilo... which treats a 4x4m pond.

What do you think? Shall I put the technical info up as part of the
thread?
Ann-Marie L


You could.
It would probably help if you displayed cites
(that were not created by you or financially involved with you)
that tell what good this "Siltex" is.
  #3  
Old May 6th 14, 06:25 PM posted to rec.ponds
Ann-Marie L
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Do you use Siltex?


Ann-Marie L;1001575 Wrote:

What we have only just realised is that domestic pondkeepers don't seem
to use a product that we use twice a year on the large lakes and village
ponds that we help to care for. That's Siltex.


Normally, organic material in water is broken down quickly by bacteria
and used in the natural processes of the aquatic environment. If the
amount of organic matter entering water is greater than the amount that
can be broken down, it will accumulate on the lake or pond, forming deep
layers of organic silt.

The lower layers of silt on the bed of the water-body may become anoxic
(contain no oxygen) due to bacterial action, appearing black in colour
and having a characteristic foul smell, and large-scale disturbance of
this deep silt can result in sudden and catastrophic de-oxygenation.

Siltex

Siltex has been one of the great revelations in water management and is
probably the most efficient method of controlling organic silt.
Siltex is a highly porous form of Calcium Carbonate consisting of
microscopic particles with an average size of less than 5 microns (5
thousands of a millimetre).
Odours are caused by the bio-degrading of fish and waterfowl faeces,
algae, rotting weed, and rotting leaf litter. As these rot and fester in
the water they produce methane gas, which causes an unpleasant smell. By
boosting the aerobic bacteria and micro-organisms the smell disappears.

• Decreases organic and oxidisable matter, which shows as a
reduction in silt levels.
• Increases oxygenation by stimulation of aerobic
micro-organisms.
• Improves water clarity by settling suspended solids.
• Reduces methane production by silt body
• Counteracts acidity in water and silt.
• Provides essential calcium for plants and animals
• Increases biodiversity within bodies of water.

Siltex is harmless to humans, mammals, birds, fish, invertebrates and
water plants*. If used in garden ponds it will cause no harm to pets
drinking the water.

*Siltex can be harmful to nuisance algae and blanketweed.

Siltex should always be applied to the whole water body and not just the
worst affected parts. In ideal conditions and when applied correctly and
in correct quantities, Siltex can remove as much as 8 – 10 inches of
silt annually.


What is Siltex?

Siltex is a finely ground Calcium Carbonate consisting of microscopic
particles with an average size of less than 5 microns (5 thousands of a
millimetre).

What is Siltex used for?

Siltex is used to treat organic silt in Ponds, Lakes, Reservoirs, rivers
and other water bodies.

How does Siltex work?

Organic silt accumulates when the micro-organisms that normally feed on
the organic matter are no longer present, due to low oxygen levels and
often increased acidity. The microscopic particles of Siltex are able to
penetrate right into the silt layer and create the right environment for
the micro-organisms to re-establish themselves and start to digest the
organic matter, thus reducing the volume of silt.

Is Siltex harmful?

Siltex is harmless to humans and pets and aquatic life with the
exception of blanketweed and some algae’s. Siltex is entirely natural
and is not chemically synthesised.

Applications.

Siltex should be distributed evenly over the water area at a rate of 1kg
(2.2lbs) per 4 square meters of water. If there are a number of
floating plants Siltex can be mixed with water in a watering can and be
applied with a watering can without the flower attachment at the rates
described above.

Siltex acts to reduce the depth of silt on the bed of a pond. The
principal mode of action is to increase the breakdown of organic waste
material by stimulating the aerobic bacteria naturally present to
multiply. These bacteria oxidise ammonia into nitrite and ultimately
nitrate, thereby reducing the loading of potentially toxic organic waste
present.
Among its other supplementary benefits, Siltex can also aid the
flocculation of suspended organic and inorganic particulates into larger
particles, which can then settle onto the bed of the waterbody. In this
way, the product can help to improve water clarity, provided that the
cause of the turbidity is addressed also.

Lastly, the dissociation of calcium ions from the dissolving Siltex
brings about the enhanced bioavailability of calcium for skeletal
development in fish and exoskeleton development in aquatic
invertebrates. In this way, Siltex can help to increase the
productivity of the water body by stimulating development of the food
chain.

Importantly, Siltex is an entirely natural product, not
anthropogenically synthesised in any way. So users can be assured that
no synthetic chemicals are introduced and safety to the ecosystem and
the gardener applying the product.

The extent to which Siltex will reduce the depth of silt present depends
on a number of variables and as such success cannot be predicted with
accuracy. However, factors such as the existing water quality and the
proportional composition of the sediment (organic vs. inorganic) can be
used as indicators of the likely effectiveness of a programme of
treatment.




--
Ann-Marie L
 




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