A Fishkeeping forum. FishKeepingBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » FishKeepingBanter.com forum » ponds » General
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Alkalinity



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old May 29th 05, 05:50 PM
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Yes, just a color comparison. After looking more closely, there are numbers
to go by. I would say I'm around 40-ppm Alkalinity. Should be at 120ppms
?????///
"~ janj JJsPond.us" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 27 May 2005 19:55:40 -0400, "Paul" wrote:


Yes, saying i'm low...........


No number, just a color? ~ jan


~Power to the Porg, Flow On!~



  #12  
Old May 29th 05, 05:51 PM
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Around 40-ppms........Thanks
"George" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s21...

"Paul" wrote in message
...
Using the test strips.
"George" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s71...

"Paul" wrote in message
...
How do I raise the alkalinity content in my pond water, its low.

What is the measurement you are getting and how are you measuring it?



What was the measurement that you got?



  #13  
Old May 29th 05, 08:33 PM
~ janj JJsPond.us
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 29 May 2005 12:51:03 -0400, "Paul" wrote:

Around 40-ppms........Thanks


I'd want to raise that too. ) ~ jan

~Power to the Porg, Flow On!~
  #14  
Old May 30th 05, 09:12 PM
George
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Paul" wrote in message
news
Around 40-ppms........Thanks


That is a little low, but not dangerlously so. If it were me, I'd just add
some limestone rocks to the pond and leave it at that. I have a limestone
waterfall, and my general hardness stays right at 80 mg/L, which is normal
for freshwater ponds.

"George" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s21...

"Paul" wrote in message
...
Using the test strips.
"George" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s71...

"Paul" wrote in message
...
How do I raise the alkalinity content in my pond water, its low.

What is the measurement you are getting and how are you measuring it?



What was the measurement that you got?





  #15  
Old May 30th 05, 10:14 PM
Reel McKoi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"George" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s72...

"Paul" wrote in message
news
Around 40-ppms........Thanks


That is a little low, but not dangerlously so. If it were me, I'd just

add
some limestone rocks to the pond and leave it at that. I have a limestone
waterfall, and my general hardness stays right at 80 mg/L, which is normal
for freshwater ponds.

=======================
And they're totally safe. They raise it slowly and gradually - no shock to
the fish.
--
McKoi.... the frugal ponder...
EVERYONE: "Please check people's headers for forgeries
before flushing." NAMES ARE BEING FORGED.
Do not feed the trolls.
~~~ }((((o ~~~ }{{{{o ~~~ }(((((o

  #16  
Old May 31st 05, 10:20 PM
George
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Reel McKoi" wrote in message
...

"George" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s72...

"Paul" wrote in message
news
Around 40-ppms........Thanks


That is a little low, but not dangerlously so. If it were me, I'd just

add
some limestone rocks to the pond and leave it at that. I have a
limestone
waterfall, and my general hardness stays right at 80 mg/L, which is
normal
for freshwater ponds.

=======================
And they're totally safe. They raise it slowly and gradually - no shock
to
the fish.
--


Exactly. And the limestone keeps the alkalinity from falling.


  #17  
Old June 1st 05, 04:04 AM
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Like how much Limestone. One big piece or smaller ones. Thanks...
"Courageous" wrote in message
...

Exactly. And the limestone keeps the alkalinity from falling.


In fact, the more that the alkalinity falls (i.e., the water is
becoming acidic), the more likely the limestone will react with
the acids in the water to, um, increase alkalinity.

This is why certain fine organic sands are to be preferred in a
marine environment, where higher alkalinity is particularly
important.

C//



  #18  
Old June 1st 05, 08:37 AM
George
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Courageous" wrote in message
...

Exactly. And the limestone keeps the alkalinity from falling.


In fact, the more that the alkalinity falls (i.e., the water is
becoming acidic), the more likely the limestone will react with
the acids in the water to, um, increase alkalinity.

This is why certain fine organic sands are to be preferred in a
marine environment, where higher alkalinity is particularly
important.

C//


In a marine environment, it is critical to have either aragonite sea sand
or a crushed coral substrate to prevent both Alkalinity and pH crashes.


  #19  
Old June 1st 05, 08:47 AM
George
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Paul" wrote in message
...
Like how much Limestone. One big piece or smaller ones. Thanks...
"Courageous" wrote in message
...

Exactly. And the limestone keeps the alkalinity from falling.


In fact, the more that the alkalinity falls (i.e., the water is
becoming acidic), the more likely the limestone will react with
the acids in the water to, um, increase alkalinity.

This is why certain fine organic sands are to be preferred in a
marine environment, where higher alkalinity is particularly
important.

C//


I don't know that there is a specific formula as not all limestone is the
same. Limestones vary greatly in their solubility and hardness. I have
about 300-400 lbs of it built up as a waterfall and for structural support
for my biofilter in one end my 1,400-gallon pond (although not all of it is
under water). Nearly all of it is dolomitic limestone (high magnesium
Limestone containing a significant fraction of dolomite), so it is harder
than pure limestone (which has calcite as a primary mineral) and has a
relatively low solubility. Even so, enough of it gets dissolved over time
that it keeps both the pH and the alkalinity in the proper ranges. Oh, and
always clean the rock before use.


  #20  
Old June 1st 05, 08:58 AM
George
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"George" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s72...

"Paul" wrote in message
...
Like how much Limestone. One big piece or smaller ones. Thanks...
"Courageous" wrote in message
...

Exactly. And the limestone keeps the alkalinity from falling.

In fact, the more that the alkalinity falls (i.e., the water is
becoming acidic), the more likely the limestone will react with
the acids in the water to, um, increase alkalinity.

This is why certain fine organic sands are to be preferred in a
marine environment, where higher alkalinity is particularly
important.

C//


I don't know that there is a specific formula as not all limestone is the
same. Limestones vary greatly in their solubility and hardness. I have
about 300-400 lbs of it built up as a waterfall and for structural
support for my biofilter in one end my 1,400-gallon pond (although not
all of it is under water). Nearly all of it is dolomitic limestone (high
magnesium Limestone containing a significant fraction of dolomite), so it
is harder than pure limestone (which has calcite as a primary mineral)
and has a relatively low solubility. Even so, enough of it gets
dissolved over time that it keeps both the pH and the alkalinity in the
proper ranges. Oh, and always clean the rock before use.


Oh yea, and you should have these rocks in an area where water can flow
over them. It helps.


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Limewater increases Alkalinity? david Reefs 2 November 25th 04 06:18 PM
[chemistry] Usage of alkaline-earth-metal buffers for increasing alkalinity Pszemol Reefs 0 June 23rd 04 04:32 AM
Mystery crash Gunther Goldfish 28 February 28th 04 04:32 AM
Can't get good alkalinity levels Reef Man Reefs 11 November 17th 03 10:56 AM
Alkalinity / Hardness Levels Peter Pan Reefs 5 October 16th 03 12:41 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 FishKeepingBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.