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How to fill a big tank



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 6th 06, 05:17 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
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Default How to fill a big tank

"Jürgen Exner" wrote in message
news[email protected]
Papa Red wrote:
Y'all seem to have forgotten to tell them something that is very
important,...The fact that a single gallon [u.s.] of water weighs, if
memory serves, 8.3 pounds,... Which I believe would be 240.7 pounds,
for a fully filled 29 gallon tank,...And that doesn't even include
any of the rocks, gravel, driftwood, et cetera that may be added to
that tank,...So they should always keep that in mind when ever they
think of just where they are going to place that new aquarium of
theirs.


Please don't forget that those 29 gallons are a nominal size, typically
calculated by measuring the _external_ size of the tank. Actual water
content will be less.
Also, rocks, gravel, driftwood, etc. will displace water and become
much lighter in the tank. Driftwood sometimes so much that you have to
weight it down.

So, let's be generous and add another 60 pounds for all the other stuff
like the tank itself, gravel, stand, etc. Then we are talking about 300
pounds total.

That is barely the average weight of two adults. If you are concerned
about your floor not being able to withstand the weight of two adults,
then maybe you should consider remodelling or moving ;-)

jue



Slightly OT, but I'm carving a new decoration for one of my tanks, out of
styrofoam which gets painted, sealed and siliconed down. The piece is
about 7 cubic feet, and at Styrofoam's buoyancy of about 67 lbs/cu.ft, I
need almost 500 lbs to hold it down. The water in the aquarium is not
going to weight much more than the Styrofoam's buoyancy! If I use much
more Styrofoam, I'll need to hold the aquarium down ;~) j/k.

Back On T, figure 10 lbs/per gallon to have a safety margin. I don't
worry about floors until I pass about 60g or 600 lbs, but I do watch that
the tank does not wiggle too much for its location (when parallel to
joists or away from walls).
--
www.NetMax.tk


  #22  
Old January 6th 06, 06:12 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank


"NetMax" wrote in message
...
Back On T, figure 10 lbs/per gallon to have a safety margin. I don't
worry about floors until I pass about 60g or 600 lbs, but I do watch that
the tank does not wiggle too much for its location (when parallel to
joists or away from walls).

===============================
I was talking to the guy who owns a well known aquarium store in my area
yesterday. We were discussing a 300g tank (I was drooling over) and he said
he recommends people use floor jacks if these biggies aren't going in a
basement on a slab. I have a wall this 300g gem would fit on
perfectly...... but I'd have to move the hutch, buy jacks..... and the
tank was something like $1300. I would want it in my
diningroom-office, not the sun-fishroom.

I came home with a bunch of new aquarium plants and a new calico oranda from
another store. I can't believe the quality of the goldfish this new store
carries, and it's only a few miles from my house. :-))
--

Koi-Lo.... frugal ponding since 1995...
Aquariums since 1952
My Pond & Aquarium Pages:
NEW PAGE: Aquariums:
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastada...ium-Page4.html
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastadaisy
~~~ }((((o ~~~ }{{{{o ~~~ }(((((o



  #23  
Old January 6th 06, 07:33 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank

"Koi-lo" wrote in message
...

"NetMax" wrote in message
...
Back On T, figure 10 lbs/per gallon to have a safety margin. I don't
worry about floors until I pass about 60g or 600 lbs, but I do watch
that the tank does not wiggle too much for its location (when parallel
to joists or away from walls).

===============================
I was talking to the guy who owns a well known aquarium store in my
area yesterday. We were discussing a 300g tank (I was drooling over)
and he said he recommends people use floor jacks if these biggies
aren't going in a basement on a slab. I have a wall this 300g gem
would fit on perfectly...... but I'd have to move the hutch, buy
jacks..... and the tank was something like $1300. I would want it
in my diningroom-office, not the sun-fishroom.


.... and.. what's the problem? ;~)

I came home with a bunch of new aquarium plants and a new calico oranda
from another store. I can't believe the quality of the goldfish this
new store carries, and it's only a few miles from my house. :-))


I had 2 Orandas and a Ryukin in a 130g at work for a while. They were
just babies, about 7" long ). They made the tank look small.
--
www.NetMax.tk


--

Koi-Lo.... frugal ponding since 1995...
Aquariums since 1952
My Pond & Aquarium Pages:
NEW PAGE: Aquariums:
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastada...ium-Page4.html
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastadaisy
~~~ }((((o ~~~ }{{{{o ~~~ }(((((o





  #24  
Old January 6th 06, 07:53 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank

On Fri, 6 Jan 2006 11:17:03 -0500, "NetMax"
wrote:

"Jürgen Exner" wrote in message
news[email protected]
Papa Red wrote:
Y'all seem to have forgotten to tell them something that is very
important,...The fact that a single gallon [u.s.] of water weighs, if
memory serves, 8.3 pounds,... Which I believe would be 240.7 pounds,
for a fully filled 29 gallon tank,...And that doesn't even include
any of the rocks, gravel, driftwood, et cetera that may be added to
that tank,...So they should always keep that in mind when ever they
think of just where they are going to place that new aquarium of
theirs.


Please don't forget that those 29 gallons are a nominal size, typically
calculated by measuring the _external_ size of the tank. Actual water
content will be less.
Also, rocks, gravel, driftwood, etc. will displace water and become
much lighter in the tank. Driftwood sometimes so much that you have to
weight it down.

So, let's be generous and add another 60 pounds for all the other stuff
like the tank itself, gravel, stand, etc. Then we are talking about 300
pounds total.

That is barely the average weight of two adults. If you are concerned
about your floor not being able to withstand the weight of two adults,
then maybe you should consider remodelling or moving ;-)

jue



Slightly OT, but I'm carving a new decoration for one of my tanks, out of
styrofoam which gets painted, sealed and siliconed down. The piece is
about 7 cubic feet, and at Styrofoam's buoyancy of about 67 lbs/cu.ft, I
need almost 500 lbs to hold it down. The water in the aquarium is not
going to weight much more than the Styrofoam's buoyancy! If I use much
more Styrofoam, I'll need to hold the aquarium down ;~) j/k.

Back On T, figure 10 lbs/per gallon to have a safety margin. I don't
worry about floors until I pass about 60g or 600 lbs, but I do watch that


the tank does not wiggle too much for its location (when parallel to
joists or away from walls).



I don't mean to be picky or pedantic ( well, yes I do) but have you
checked that 67 number? since fresh water weighs 62.4 lbs per cubic
ft, and sea water weighs 64 lbs per cubic ft, I wonder what you're
putting in the tank that would make styrofoam so buoyant. :-)



  #25  
Old January 6th 06, 09:49 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank

"Charles" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 6 Jan 2006 11:17:03 -0500, "NetMax"
wrote:

"Jürgen Exner" wrote in message
news[email protected]
Papa Red wrote:
Y'all seem to have forgotten to tell them something that is very
important,...The fact that a single gallon [u.s.] of water weighs,
if
memory serves, 8.3 pounds,... Which I believe would be 240.7 pounds,
for a fully filled 29 gallon tank,...And that doesn't even include
any of the rocks, gravel, driftwood, et cetera that may be added to
that tank,...So they should always keep that in mind when ever they
think of just where they are going to place that new aquarium of
theirs.

Please don't forget that those 29 gallons are a nominal size,
typically
calculated by measuring the _external_ size of the tank. Actual water
content will be less.
Also, rocks, gravel, driftwood, etc. will displace water and become
much lighter in the tank. Driftwood sometimes so much that you have
to
weight it down.

So, let's be generous and add another 60 pounds for all the other
stuff
like the tank itself, gravel, stand, etc. Then we are talking about
300
pounds total.

That is barely the average weight of two adults. If you are concerned
about your floor not being able to withstand the weight of two
adults,
then maybe you should consider remodelling or moving ;-)

jue



Slightly OT, but I'm carving a new decoration for one of my tanks, out
of
styrofoam which gets painted, sealed and siliconed down. The piece is
about 7 cubic feet, and at Styrofoam's buoyancy of about 67 lbs/cu.ft,
I
need almost 500 lbs to hold it down. The water in the aquarium is not
going to weight much more than the Styrofoam's buoyancy! If I use
much
more Styrofoam, I'll need to hold the aquarium down ;~) j/k.

Back On T, figure 10 lbs/per gallon to have a safety margin. I don't
worry about floors until I pass about 60g or 600 lbs, but I do watch
that


the tank does not wiggle too much for its location (when parallel to
joists or away from walls).



I don't mean to be picky or pedantic ( well, yes I do) but have you
checked that 67 number? since fresh water weighs 62.4 lbs per cubic
ft, and sea water weighs 64 lbs per cubic ft, I wonder what you're
putting in the tank that would make styrofoam so buoyant. :-)



Meticulous, not pedantic, and when you get meticulous (or detail oriented
as some people call it), I tend to learn things. I dug through my notes
to find where I'd written down the specs from DOW chemical, but couldn't
locate them. The only thing that I can think of is that it should be 57
lbs/cu.ft, not 67. Extruded styrofoam is about 1.5 lbs/cu.ft., so I'd
done a calculation using water at 58.5 lbs/cu.ft. I think that makes
more sense, or the aquarium would really be lifting off of the ground
;~).
--
www.NetMax.tk


  #26  
Old January 6th 06, 09:59 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank


"NetMax" wrote in message
...
"Koi-lo" wrote in message
...

"NetMax" wrote in message
...
Back On T, figure 10 lbs/per gallon to have a safety margin. I don't
worry about floors until I pass about 60g or 600 lbs, but I do watch
that the tank does not wiggle too much for its location (when parallel
to joists or away from walls).

===============================
I was talking to the guy who owns a well known aquarium store in my area
yesterday. We were discussing a 300g tank (I was drooling over) and he
said he recommends people use floor jacks if these biggies aren't going
in a basement on a slab. I have a wall this 300g gem would fit on
perfectly...... but I'd have to move the hutch, buy jacks..... and the
tank was something like $1300. I would want it in my
diningroom-office, not the sun-fishroom.


... and.. what's the problem? ;~)


I don't think I can sneak a 300g tank with the stand past my husband........
:-D Another 10 or maybe even a 20L... but a 300???? I sure would love it
in here and there's space for it if I move the hutch to the other wall.
Jacking the floor could also be problematic as there's a crawl space under
the house and soil that gets soft and sinks. I would need concrete footers
of some kind to keep the jacks from sinking. We're now getting into BIG
BUCKS. Our foundation had to go several feet deep and is over 2' wide.

I came home with a bunch of new aquarium plants and a new calico oranda
from another store. I can't believe the quality of the goldfish this new
store carries, and it's only a few miles from my house. :-))


I had 2 Orandas and a Ryukin in a 130g at work for a while. They were
just babies, about 7" long ). They made the tank look small.


I know, I know.... they'll outgrow the 55s in time. Then they'll go
outside in 150g pools, breed, and I'll be bringing in the babies to enjoy!
BTW, those 500g pools I have the koi fry in are only $14 at Wally*World.

--

Koi-Lo.... frugal ponding since 1995...
Aquariums since 1952
My Pond & Aquarium Pages:
NEW PAGE: Aquariums:
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastada...ium-Page4.html
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastadaisy
~~~ }((((o ~~~ }{{{{o ~~~ }(((((o



  #27  
Old January 6th 06, 11:31 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank

In article ,
"Sue" wrote:

- "Suzie-Q" wrote in message
- ...
- In article ,
- Marco Schwarz wrote:
-
- - Tropical or nontropical tank?
-
-
- Actually, what I want to do is "rescue" five large fish from the
- tiny tank they're in at Wal-Mart. (I know this will only encourage
- them to restock, so I'm torn.) I forget what they're called. They're
- roundish shaped (like silver dollars) and have orangish bellies. The
- upper parts of their bodies are gray. The description of the fish
- indicates that they are about as big as they'll get at 5 to 6".
- --
- 8^)~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
-
- Forget it - from your description those fish are either pirhana (
- http://www.jedessine.com/MUSEE/FE/PHOTOS/pirhana.jpg ) or Pacu. (
- http://www.elmersaquarium.com/10pacu.htm ) Neither are suitable for a 29g
- tank & the former get to about 10" SL (+tail) the latter get to 3' + !
- You can't stock a tank immediately anyway and it is unfair to any fish to
- "rescue" then without the knowledge to give them a proper home.

Which is one reason I come here.

They look more like the Pacu pix. It sucks that they're in such a small
tank now. But you've convinced me that I can't give them a better home.
Thanks for your advice.
--
8^(~~~ Sue (remove the x to e-mail)
~~~~~~
"I reserve the absolute right to be smarter
today than I was yesterday." -Adlai Stevenson

http://www.suzanne-eckhardt.com/
http://www.intergnat.com/malebashing/
http://www.intergnat.com/pussygames/
  #28  
Old January 6th 06, 11:49 PM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank

When I installed my 240 gal, I added another post beam support structure
under the floor where the tank would be. I determined that I have about
3000 lbs spanning 12 sqft. Even though that may be enough for new
construction limits, I felt a lot better with the additional support
underneath.

Fishman

"Koi-lo" wrote in message
...

"NetMax" wrote in message
...
Back On T, figure 10 lbs/per gallon to have a safety margin. I don't
worry about floors until I pass about 60g or 600 lbs, but I do watch

that
the tank does not wiggle too much for its location (when parallel to
joists or away from walls).

===============================
I was talking to the guy who owns a well known aquarium store in my area
yesterday. We were discussing a 300g tank (I was drooling over) and he

said
he recommends people use floor jacks if these biggies aren't going in a
basement on a slab. I have a wall this 300g gem would fit on
perfectly...... but I'd have to move the hutch, buy jacks..... and the
tank was something like $1300. I would want it in my
diningroom-office, not the sun-fishroom.

I came home with a bunch of new aquarium plants and a new calico oranda

from
another store. I can't believe the quality of the goldfish this new store
carries, and it's only a few miles from my house. :-))
--

Koi-Lo.... frugal ponding since 1995...
Aquariums since 1952
My Pond & Aquarium Pages:
NEW PAGE: Aquariums:
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastada...ium-Page4.html
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastadaisy
~~~ }((((o ~~~ }{{{{o ~~~ }(((((o





  #29  
Old January 7th 06, 06:20 AM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank


"Fishman" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
When I installed my 240 gal, I added another post beam support structure
under the floor where the tank would be. I determined that I have about
3000 lbs spanning 12 sqft. Even though that may be enough for new
construction limits, I felt a lot better with the additional support
underneath.

===========================
Gotcha! We have extra supports under the floor in the sun-fishroom but I
spend so little time in there I don't really get to enjoy watching the tanks
like I do the smaller ones in here. I would rather have the large tanks in
the room I spend most of my time in. The wall (with no "extra" supports
under the floor) the hutch is on is ideal and right across from all the
"goings on" here. I just may move one or both of the 55s in here when the
Shubunkins go outside for the summer. Both tanks would CROSS the floor
joists and would be on the inner central wall which is right over the
central support piers. Two 55s wouldn't be a problem weight wise. That's
probably the route I'll take in April.
--

Koi-Lo.... frugal ponding since 1995...
Aquariums since 1952
My Pond & Aquarium Pages:
NEW PAGE: Aquariums:
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastada...ium-Page4.html
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastadaisy
~~~ }((((o ~~~ }{{{{o ~~~ }(((((o




  #30  
Old January 7th 06, 09:55 AM posted to rec.aquaria.freshwater.misc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default How to fill a big tank

If you're crossing the beams or joists, you may very well have enough
support for that 300. =)

I made a deal with the Mrs that if I went down to only 2 tanks, could I pick
the sizes? She said yes and now I have one of my 2. The 240 gal.

The second tank will come after I graduate and get my degree. grin

Fishman

"Koi-lo" wrote in message
...

"Fishman" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
When I installed my 240 gal, I added another post beam support structure
under the floor where the tank would be. I determined that I have about
3000 lbs spanning 12 sqft. Even though that may be enough for new
construction limits, I felt a lot better with the additional support
underneath.

===========================
Gotcha! We have extra supports under the floor in the sun-fishroom but I
spend so little time in there I don't really get to enjoy watching the

tanks
like I do the smaller ones in here. I would rather have the large tanks

in
the room I spend most of my time in. The wall (with no "extra" supports
under the floor) the hutch is on is ideal and right across from all the
"goings on" here. I just may move one or both of the 55s in here when the
Shubunkins go outside for the summer. Both tanks would CROSS the floor
joists and would be on the inner central wall which is right over the
central support piers. Two 55s wouldn't be a problem weight wise. That's
probably the route I'll take in April.
--

Koi-Lo.... frugal ponding since 1995...
Aquariums since 1952
My Pond & Aquarium Pages:
NEW PAGE: Aquariums:
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastada...ium-Page4.html
http://bellsouthpwp.net/s/h/shastadaisy
~~~ }((((o ~~~ }{{{{o ~~~ }(((((o






 




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