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Python Question



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 12th 03, 01:17 PM
DCrowno835
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Default Python Question


Ok, Python is good for removing water, but what about adding water.
How can you add water straight from the tap to your aquarium
with a python and treat it, before it enters the aquarium???


I only use my python to remove the water. I use a powerhead to replace aged
water from a 40g rubbermaid can (on a dolly...).
I'm uncomfortable using the same python to add water as to remove it. I may be
transferring disease and not know it...

Deanna
  #2  
Old August 12th 03, 02:02 PM
Geezer From The Freezer
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Default Python Question

Deanna,

Whats a powerhead?
  #3  
Old August 13th 03, 02:42 AM
E.Otter
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Default Python Question

Personally I fill a very small bucket full of tank water before changing.
Then add all my declorinator, ph chemicals, etc... to it. Then when I fill
the tank with my python I hold the bucket over the tank and initially spray
the water into it. The result is I very slowly add the chemically treated
water mixed with tap water into the tank. Once the bucket is empty I
continue to fill the tank with tap water. I spray the water into the tank
with the intent of making as much of a splash as possible. The more splash
the more the water will aerate. My fish don't seem to mind or even notice
the cleaning and filling process.

Some people also are concerned with using the same hose to clean and fill
the tank. Do what I did, cut the original hose in half. Or you could also
get another hose from the hardware store. The python takes standard
one-half inch hose and hose attachments. In fact, the only parts you cannot
get at ANY hardware store is the gravel cleaner tube and the part that
attaches to the fawcette. Everything in between can be unscrewed like any
garden-hose. I now have two hoses: one for filling the tank and the other
for cleaning it.

The only real trick is making sure the water temperature added to the tank
matches the water temperature in the tank.

E.Otter


  #4  
Old August 13th 03, 04:35 AM
Kodiak
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Default Python Question

Are you comfortable with the effectivenesss of the dechlorinator using
straight tapwater right into the tank? Are most people doing this nowadays,
or is it still the best bet to do it the old way, age the water for at least
24 hours...?
,,,Kodiak.

"Azul" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 14:02:25 +0100, Geezer From The Freezer
wrote:

Deanna,

Whats a powerhead?


Many people put the declore in the tank and then fill it using the
temperature corrected water directly from the tank.


Azul



  #5  
Old August 13th 03, 05:14 AM
Jim Brown
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Default Python Question


E.Otter wrote in message
link.net...
"snipped"
The python takes standard
one-half inch hose and hose attachments. In fact, the only parts you

cannot
get at ANY hardware store is the gravel cleaner tube and the part that
attaches to the fawcette. Everything in between can be unscrewed like any
garden-hose. I now have two hoses: one for filling the tank and the other
for cleaning it.
E.Otter



Actually, the first 'Python' knock off I saw was one that used a plastic
shampoo bottle with the bottom cut off as the cleaner tube. The faucet
connector can be bought at hardware stores if you ask for a waterbed fill
and drain attachment. I also have a couple friends that found metal ones in
old time mom and pop hardware stores, where they were sold for filling and
draining wringer washers. Their metal ones last much longer than the
plastic ones with metal screws.

Jim


  #7  
Old August 13th 03, 05:26 AM
Jim Brown
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Default Python Question

FWIW, I have 90+ aquariums. Usually, each day, I do water changes on
aquariums averaging 300 gallons. Since I change 100 gallons minimum daily, I
don't have the capacity to age water. Straight from the tap with changes of
from 25-50% and I seldom use any dechlorinating products. Tender fish are
the exception and I lean to RO water for them.
But I know my fish, they are all healthy, and I know my water, so I can skip
the aging.
For newcomers who haven't yet got the handle on water management, food
amounts, and problems with less than healthy fish, aging the water is good,
with chemical additions also being effective.
BTW, the old way was just to top up aquariums, not do changes.

Jim

Kodiak wrote in message
.. .
Are you comfortable with the effectivenesss of the dechlorinator using
straight tapwater right into the tank? Are most people doing this

nowadays,
or is it still the best bet to do it the old way, age the water for at

least
24 hours...?
,,,Kodiak.

"Azul" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 14:02:25 +0100, Geezer From The Freezer
wrote:

Deanna,

Whats a powerhead?


Many people put the declore in the tank and then fill it using the
temperature corrected water directly from the tank.


Azul





  #8  
Old August 13th 03, 07:18 AM
Donald Kerns
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Default Python Question

Gunther wrote:

I actually worry more about getting the temperature right:
I find myself constantly fiddling with the mixture as it
fills.


Me too.

I've got a tankless water heater that shuts down if I'm not drawing 1/2
gallon per minute of hot water, so I'm always antsy about mixing "just
a trickle of hot water to match the temp."

-D
--
"There is nothing so strong as gentleness, and there is nothing so
gentle as real strength." St. Francis de Sales
  #9  
Old August 13th 03, 03:59 PM
DCrowno835
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Default Python Question


Whats a powerhead?


It's actually an undergravel system that pumps water down through the gravel.
I just attach a 3/4" hose to the outflow valve, and submerge the intake
(actually, you can put the whole thing in a bucket) and let the powerhead do
the rest. Keep in mind however, that I forget that most of you have city
water, as I have my own well, and do not have the chemical problems that some
of you do. I simply put my water in the garbage can, and drop in a HUGE
airstone for a couple of days. This is because well water is under pressure,
and the air breaks it down. I do have a high iron content, but all my tests
are usually very close to perfect.

PetsMart.com has a few power heads, they're not expensive, and if you only plan
on using it to fill a tank, you don't need anything high-tech.

Hope this helps.

deanna
 




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