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ghost shrimp keep dying. arrgh!



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 30th 03, 04:37 PM
Jim Brown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ghost shrimp keep dying. arrgh!

Ghost shrimp are basically sold as feeders. Down the hatch before they die.
I have kept them for multiple generations in the past without iodine
supplements, but since then, it appears that may be a viable process.
One problem I did notice was that the shrimp with a large white patch in the
carapace were the first to die. It seems this is a lethal parasite, and is
easily transmitted to the other shrimp. If you could be selective and avoid
or at least dispose of these white bodied shrimp, I think your luck will
turn around. Once I had no shrimp with this problem, spawnings kept
happening and none of the following generations had the problem. Got to
where I had too many ghost shrimp.
You are right in not fooling around with your water. Much easier on you and
the fish to use what comes out of the tap.
'Trust me". Never trust someone who says that. Trust has to be earned.
You seem to have a good grasp on your own set-up. All I would suggest is
try healthier ghost shrimp. Maybe waiting a month then try some of the
algae eating shrimp. Cost more but usually healthier.

Jim

yelohk wrote in message
...
I'm new to the hobby, so there is much that I don't know. I'm not sure
why but I keep losing ghost shrimp. I'm on my fifth batch so far.

At first I didn't use iodine and they died.

Then I tried adding kent's marine iodine, as I saw suggested in another
newsgroup, and they die. Perhaps I'm using an incorrect dosage?

Although some people say they don't use iodine or salt or anything.

Usually they last a few weeks before turning white and dying, but this
batch is dying within hours.

I don't know why I subject myself to this because I hate watching them
suffer. But I keep trying because they're fascinating and they do a good
job of cleaning the tank, although I regularly vacuum and the otos take
care of the algae (what algae?).

So far within hours of my latest purchase I have lost one and the others
aren't looking good.

The last time I had a batch die off quickly (they looked like they had
been cooked) was from another store. They told me afterwards it must
have been pH shock, as they maintain their tanks at ~7.0 and my tank was
7.8. I was told I should try to maintain my tank at a pH of 7.0. I felt
it was difficult enough to keep my tank stable as it is without throwing
in another parameter.

The ones I've bought from petsmart seem the hardiest, but that may be
because they're located close enough to use the same water supply as me
(I think), and their water is the same ph as mine. But I still lose them
within approx. 6 weeks.

This current store where I bought them from today said that basically it
is impossible for retail stores to maintain a consistent pH due to the
constant water changes and fish load in the tanks. The guy also told me
he was a marine biologist and zoologist, so that I could trust what he
told me. He basically said test kits were inaccurate, it's impossible to
maintain a constant pH, and the only thing I needed to be concerned
about was if my ph was low 6 or below or 8.4+ because ghost shrimp have
a hard time surviving in those levels.

Although after hearing my prior losses he recommended that I dose my
tank with antiobiotics (erythomyacin (sp?)) for 8 days. He thought it
might be a bacterial infection that didn't harm the fish, but affected
crustaceans. Does this sound feasible (that the cause could be bacterial)?

He then suggested that if that didn't work I try using bottled water.

I balked at his suggestion that I add antiobiotics to my tank, because I
am afraid of adversly affecting my tank somehow by causing an imbalance
in the tank, that the antibiotics my harm my plants, or harm the fish
currently in the tank. Although he seemed to believe that that line of
thinking was nuts. So he suggested that I slowly add tankwater to the
bag then add the shrimp to my tank. Within 5 hours one is dead, and the
other three are cloudy.

I'm beginning to wonder if this antibiotic thing is a good idea.
However, I still question whether pH is a factor... There has to be
something in the water...

Does anyone have any ideas why they might be dying?

My pH is ~7.8
Ammonia and Nitrites are 0.
Nitrates are ~10.
I do 25% weekly water changes
I regularly add dechlorinator, iodine, and flourish to the tank

I've only got my tank up and running in early march, but the test
results have been consistent since the tank cycled.

Every time I look at them I feel awful.

--

direct replies: yelohk AT yahoo



  #2  
Old June 30th 03, 10:21 PM
donovan n
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ghost shrimp keep dying. arrgh!

The mysterious ghost shrimp turning white and dying disease.

Some people say it's a parasite, others say it's due to lack of iodine
or some other mineral, whitel others say it's due to pH shock.

I purchased a group of 6 ghost shrimp (feeders) to put in a six gallon
aquarium and lost two of them within a couple weeks, the other four lasted
about two months with none of them turning white. About four months after
purchase one of them turned white and stayed that way for a couple weeks and
then died.

I dind't add iodine to the water, but I did feed the shrimp hermit crab
food wich contanes alot of iodine and other beneficial minerals for inverts.

I don't know what caused it. But the white condition could be more of a
symptom. Like a runny nose, lots of different things can cause it.

Ghost shrimp are found all over the world, from the gulf of mexico to
the florida everglades to british columbia all coming from very different
water conditions. Some people say that If they get their ghosts to breed in
a tank the offspring never show any sign of the mysterious whitespot that
the parents might eventually show.

But as for me, I use amano shrimp. They don't mystiously die on me, in
fact, they seem nearly bulletproof, having been transfered between three
tanks with very different water conditions. They scavenge just as well and
never raise their claws and try to have a stand off with a tetra over a
piece of food. They are alot cuter too (until they reach full size, then
they look kinda creepy).

--donovan


  #3  
Old July 1st 03, 12:39 AM
Haywire
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ghost shrimp keep dying. arrgh!

Yeah, I was totally surprised to see amano's had spawned in my tank with
cardinals, a dwarf rainbow, discus, and clown loaches to predate on them, I
was even feeding mysis to the gang.

"Jim Brown" wrote in
:

Ghost shrimp are basically sold as feeders. Down the hatch before
they die. I have kept them for multiple generations in the past
without iodine supplements, but since then, it appears that may be a
viable process. One problem I did notice was that the shrimp with a
large white patch in the carapace were the first to die. It seems
this is a lethal parasite, and is easily transmitted to the other
shrimp. If you could be selective and avoid or at least dispose of
these white bodied shrimp, I think your luck will turn around. Once I
had no shrimp with this problem, spawnings kept happening and none of
the following generations had the problem. Got to where I had too
many ghost shrimp. You are right in not fooling around with your
water. Much easier on you and the fish to use what comes out of the
tap. 'Trust me". Never trust someone who says that. Trust has to be
earned. You seem to have a good grasp on your own set-up. All I would
suggest is try healthier ghost shrimp. Maybe waiting a month then try
some of the algae eating shrimp. Cost more but usually healthier.

Jim

yelohk wrote in message
...
I'm new to the hobby, so there is much that I don't know. I'm not
sure why but I keep losing ghost shrimp. I'm on my fifth batch so
far.

At first I didn't use iodine and they died.

Then I tried adding kent's marine iodine, as I saw suggested in
another newsgroup, and they die. Perhaps I'm using an incorrect
dosage?

Although some people say they don't use iodine or salt or anything.

Usually they last a few weeks before turning white and dying, but
this batch is dying within hours.

I don't know why I subject myself to this because I hate watching
them suffer. But I keep trying because they're fascinating and they
do a good job of cleaning the tank, although I regularly vacuum and
the otos take care of the algae (what algae?).

So far within hours of my latest purchase I have lost one and the
others aren't looking good.

The last time I had a batch die off quickly (they looked like they
had been cooked) was from another store. They told me afterwards it
must have been pH shock, as they maintain their tanks at ~7.0 and my
tank was 7.8. I was told I should try to maintain my tank at a pH of
7.0. I felt it was difficult enough to keep my tank stable as it is
without throwing in another parameter.

The ones I've bought from petsmart seem the hardiest, but that may be
because they're located close enough to use the same water supply as
me (I think), and their water is the same ph as mine. But I still
lose them within approx. 6 weeks.

This current store where I bought them from today said that basically
it is impossible for retail stores to maintain a consistent pH due to
the constant water changes and fish load in the tanks. The guy also
told me he was a marine biologist and zoologist, so that I could
trust what he told me. He basically said test kits were inaccurate,
it's impossible to maintain a constant pH, and the only thing I
needed to be concerned about was if my ph was low 6 or below or 8.4+
because ghost shrimp have a hard time surviving in those levels.

Although after hearing my prior losses he recommended that I dose my
tank with antiobiotics (erythomyacin (sp?)) for 8 days. He thought it
might be a bacterial infection that didn't harm the fish, but
affected crustaceans. Does this sound feasible (that the cause could
be bacterial)?

He then suggested that if that didn't work I try using bottled water.

I balked at his suggestion that I add antiobiotics to my tank,
because I am afraid of adversly affecting my tank somehow by causing
an imbalance in the tank, that the antibiotics my harm my plants, or
harm the fish currently in the tank. Although he seemed to believe
that that line of thinking was nuts. So he suggested that I slowly
add tankwater to the bag then add the shrimp to my tank. Within 5
hours one is dead, and the other three are cloudy.

I'm beginning to wonder if this antibiotic thing is a good idea.
However, I still question whether pH is a factor... There has to be
something in the water...

Does anyone have any ideas why they might be dying?

My pH is ~7.8
Ammonia and Nitrites are 0.
Nitrates are ~10.
I do 25% weekly water changes
I regularly add dechlorinator, iodine, and flourish to the tank

I've only got my tank up and running in early march, but the test
results have been consistent since the tank cycled.

Every time I look at them I feel awful.

--

direct replies: yelohk AT yahoo





  #4  
Old July 1st 03, 03:33 AM
donovan n
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ghost shrimp keep dying. arrgh!

Did any of those amano spawnlings survive to adulthood?

--donovan


  #5  
Old July 1st 03, 02:15 PM
Donald Kerns
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ghost shrimp keep dying. arrgh!

donovan n wrote:

They are alot cuter too (until they reach full size, then
they look kinda creepy).


Just curious, what's "full size" on an Amano?

-D
--
"When you've lost your ability to laugh, you've lost your ability to
think straight." -To Inherit the Wind
  #6  
Old July 6th 03, 09:02 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default ghost shrimp keep dying. arrgh!

Jim Brown wrote:
Ghost shrimp are basically sold as feeders. Down the hatch before they die.
I have kept them for multiple generations in the past without iodine
supplements, but since then, it appears that may be a viable process.

[snip]

Jim



My experience has been similar. I bought 13 to help start a 70 gal about
2 years ago. The population dipped, then shot back up. At points I've
had as many as 30 swimming around. The population seems to self-regulate,
so I don't worry about it at all. For the most part, I've done no water
modification, pH 7.6-8.0, KH 6, GH 4 (IIRC, I'm not in front of my log).
I started CO2 about a week ago, and have gradually lowered the pH to 7.0.
We'll see what they think about that.

-parc


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"This song is Copyrighted in U.S., under Seal of Copyright # 154085, for a
period of 28 years, and anybody caught singin' it without our permission,
will be mighty good friends of ourn, cause we don't give a dern. Publish it.
Write it. Sing it. Swing to it. Yodel it. We wrote it, that's all we wanted
to do." --Woody Guthrie on Copyright


 




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