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-   -   Worms in the aquarium (http://www.fishkeepingbanter.com/showthread.php?t=8376)

Jim K December 10th 03 02:10 PM

Worms in the aquarium
 
I need some help identifying worms in my aquarium. My tank is heavily
planted, and I recently found some worms moving along the substrate. They
are reddish-brown, about 2 inches in length and 1/8" in diameter. I would
supply a photo but they disappear very quickly.

My questions a

1. What are they?
2. Where would they have come from?
3. Are they harmful to the fish?

Thanks in advance.



Kay December 12th 03 06:40 AM

Worms in the aquarium
 

I need some help identifying worms in my aquarium. My tank is heavily
planted, and I recently found some worms moving along the substrate. They
are reddish-brown, about 2 inches in length and 1/8" in diameter. I would
supply a photo but they disappear very quickly.

My questions a

1. What are they?
2. Where would they have come from?
3. Are they harmful to the fish?


I had worms like that. They didn't hurt the fish. But my fish were to
small to catch them. I think they were called a sand worm? Came with a
plant, They kind scotch allong. They grab the gravel on one end when you
use the syphon. They reproduce at a fast rate. They live off of excess
fish food.

How I got rid of them was to vaccum the gravel deep with every water
change, I knew they were gone after a few weeks of vaccming and no worm.
They really hang on tight on the vaccum.

Kay


JEB December 13th 03 05:37 AM

Worms in the aquarium
 
Sounds like a leech. Probably got in on a plant.

James


coelacanth December 13th 03 07:27 AM

Worms in the aquarium
 
I think these are probably planaria or other flatworm. They live
on excess food and are usually harmless (though they have near
relatives which are parasitic and not usually seen in a free
swimming stage). Try feeding a little less if they get out of hand.
Many fish relish them, so they may just disappear.

They may have come to you on a plant or unnoticed in the
bag with a fish.

-coelacanth

"Jim K" wrote in message
...
I need some help identifying worms in my aquarium. My tank is heavily
planted, and I recently found some worms moving along the substrate. They
are reddish-brown, about 2 inches in length and 1/8" in diameter. I would
supply a photo but they disappear very quickly.

My questions a

1. What are they?
2. Where would they have come from?
3. Are they harmful to the fish?

Thanks in advance.





Dunter Powries December 13th 03 01:27 PM

Worms in the aquarium
 
Planaria are white, somewhat smaller than described, and will usually be
seen on the glass after lights-out.

coelacanth wrote in message
. com...
I think these are probably planaria or other flatworm. They live
on excess food and are usually harmless (though they have near
relatives which are parasitic and not usually seen in a free
swimming stage). Try feeding a little less if they get out of hand.
Many fish relish them, so they may just disappear.

They may have come to you on a plant or unnoticed in the
bag with a fish.

-coelacanth

"Jim K" wrote in message
...
I need some help identifying worms in my aquarium. My tank is heavily
planted, and I recently found some worms moving along the substrate.

They
are reddish-brown, about 2 inches in length and 1/8" in diameter. I

would
supply a photo but they disappear very quickly.

My questions a

1. What are they?
2. Where would they have come from?
3. Are they harmful to the fish?

Thanks in advance.







JEB December 13th 03 09:35 PM

Worms in the aquarium
 
I had a couple of worms matching this description precisely, and they
were leeches. They are difficult to catch in my tank because it has
slate attached to the back and they hide out behind the slate. I did
get one, photographed it, but don't have a web presence and can't post
pics here. This is probably one of the non-parasitic variety, as it
never has bothered any of my fish, shrimp or snails.

Hunt around for some photos of leeches on the net and you should be able
to identify it, if that is what it is. You may not see anything exactly
like it, but the body shape will be close enough to compare.

James


coelacanth December 14th 03 06:13 AM

Worms in the aquarium
 
uhh--there are hundreds of species of planaria
(Turbellaria) in a variety of colors and
sizes. The ones I've seen most frequently are
brown and greater than one inch in length.

-coelacanth

P.S. Sorry to get all defensive, but I raised
these guys for a science fair project one
year long ago and I'm quite fond of the
little buggers.

"Dunter Powries" wrote in message
...
Planaria are white, somewhat smaller than described, and will usually be
seen on the glass after lights-out.

coelacanth wrote in message
. com...
I think these are probably planaria or other flatworm. They live
on excess food and are usually harmless (though they have near
relatives which are parasitic and not usually seen in a free
swimming stage). Try feeding a little less if they get out of hand.
Many fish relish them, so they may just disappear.

They may have come to you on a plant or unnoticed in the
bag with a fish.

-coelacanth

"Jim K" wrote in message
...
I need some help identifying worms in my aquarium. My tank is heavily
planted, and I recently found some worms moving along the substrate.

They
are reddish-brown, about 2 inches in length and 1/8" in diameter. I

would
supply a photo but they disappear very quickly.

My questions a

1. What are they?
2. Where would they have come from?
3. Are they harmful to the fish?

Thanks in advance.









jamyyjhon March 3rd 11 06:50 PM

I have this worm. They do not hurt the fish. But I am a small fish to catch them. I think they are called sand worms? Come up with a factory, they are a bit of Scotland allong. They grabbed one end when you use the gravel siphon. Their rapid reproduction rate. They live in excess of fish food.

rioncapsi July 1st 11 07:24 PM

They didn't aching the fish. But my angle were to small to bolt them. I anticipate they were alleged a beach worm? Came with a plant, They affectionate scotch allong. They grab the alluvium on one end if you use the syphon. They carbon at a fast rate. They reside off of excess fish food.

Hayes October 27th 11 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim K (Post 41016)
I need some help identifying worms in my aquarium. My tank is heavily
planted, and I recently found some worms moving along the substrate. They
are reddish-brown, about 2 inches in length and 1/8" in diameter. I would
supply a photo but they disappear very quickly.

My questions a

1. What are they?
2. Where would they have come from?
3. Are they harmful to the fish?

Thanks in advance.

Those are planaria worms. They won't hurt your fish, but they are a sign of overfeeding, or having too many nutrients in your tank. You need to vacuum the gravel really well for several days in a row to get rid of any uneaten food in it and stop feeding your fish so much.

The tank with the Oscars is a bit of a problem because you can't add any small fish to eat the worms that won't get eaten by the Oscars and feeder guppies or goldfish that might eat the worms might have diseases that would be passed along to your Oscars if they ate them. I'd say your best bet is to try to starve them out. Feed your fish tiny amounts and make sure they eat every speck of the food. Keep your tank water very clean with water changes and thorough vacuuming of the substrate and the worms should go away.

If you don't feed the fish in the tank with the tetras and angels for several days, the fish should eat the planaria worms and get rid of them fairly quickly.


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